Turns Out, TSA Employees Have A Secret Facebook Group With 18,000 People And Here Are Some Of Their Worst Vents

A few months ago, an investigation uncovered a secret Border Patrol Facebook group. The group was filled with vulgar, sexist and racist posts that were made by federal border agents. From an obscene illustration featuring Rep. Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez to jokes about migrant deaths, the content left many people completely baffled. And if you think that group was bad, well, as it turns out, TSA employees are no better. Recently, NBC Washington revealed that Transportation Security Administration employees have their own Facebook group with 18,000 current and former employees called TSA Breakroom. The employees used it to vent about their managers, coworkers and of course the travelers who, in some cases, were described as ‘idiots’. Posts were filled with hate, frustration, …

Germany says it wont ban Huawei or any 5G supplier up front

Germany is resisting US pressure to shut out Chinese tech giant Huawei from its 5G networks — saying it will not ban any supplier for the next-gen mobile networks on an up front basis, per Reuters. “Essentially our approach is as follows: We are not taking a pre-emptive decision to ban any actor, or any company,” government spokesman, Steffen Seibert, told a news conference in Berlin yesterday. The country’s Federal Network Agency is slated to be publishing detailed security guidance on the technical and governance criteria for 5G networks in the next few days. The next-gen mobile technology delivers faster speeds and lower latency than current-gen cellular technologies, as well as supporting many more connections per cell site. So it’s being …

Facebook sues OnlineNIC for domain name fraud associated with malicious activity

Facebook today announced it has filed suit in California against domain registrar OnlineNIC and its proxy service ID Shield for registering domain names that pretend to be associated with Facebook, like www-facebook-login.com or facebook-mails.com, for example. Facebook says these domains are intentionally designed to mislead and confuse end users, who believe they’re interacting with Facebook. These fake domains are also often associated with malicious activity, like phishing. While some who register such domains hope to eventually sell them back to Facebook at a marked-up price, earning a profit, others have worse intentions. And with the launch of Facebook’s own cryptocurrency, Libra, a number of new domain cybersquatters have emerged. Facebook was recently able to take down some of these, like …

6 tips founders need to know about securing their startup

If you’ve read anything of mine in the past year, you know just how complicated security can be. Every day it seems there’s a new security lapse, a breach, a hack, or an inadvertent exposure, such as leaving a cloud storage server unprotected without a password. These things happen, but they don’t have to; aecurity isn’t as difficult as it sounds, but there’s no one-size-fits-all solution. We sat down with three experts on the Extra Crunch stage at TechCrunch’s Disrupt SF earlier this month to help startups and founders understand what they need to do, when, and why. We asked Google’s Heather Adkins, Duo’s Dug Song, and IOActive’s Jennifer Sunshine Steffens for their best advice. Here’s what they had to …

A set of new tools can decrypt files locked by Stop, a highly active ransomware

Thousands of ransomware victims may finally get some long-awaited relief. New Zealand-based security company Emsisoft has built a set of decryption tools for Stop, a family of ransomware that includes Djvu and Puma, which they say could help victims recover some of their files. Stop is believed to be the most active ransomware in the world, accounting for more than half of all ransomware infections, according to figures from ID-Ransomware, a free site that helps identify infections. But Emsisoft said that figure is likely to be far higher. If you’ve never had ransomware, you’re one of the lucky ones. Ransomware is one of the more common ways nowadays for some criminals to make money by infecting computers with malware that locks …

Person Reviews Expensive Smart Lock On Twitter, Shows How Most Burglars Can Outsmart It In Just 10 Seconds

Locks aren’t something that most of us think about in our daily lives — they’re just there. We lock our homes when we leave for school or work in the mornings and we unlock them when we come back. We don’t give locks a second thought unless there’s been a break-in or we become locked out. Cybergibbons, who describes himself as a reverse engineer, hardware hacker, security analyst, lock picker and heist planner, figured out the vulnerabilities of one particular smart lock — the Pineworld Lock that costs 139.99 pounds. According to the security specialist, some burglars could get the expensive lock open in around 10 seconds. Bored Panda interviewed Cybergibbons, aka Andrew Tierney, so scroll down to read more …

The Wrong Way to Talk About a Shooter’s Manifesto

Less than 20 minutes before a mass shooting in El Paso that left 20 people dead and dozens more wounded, the alleged gunman appears to have published a manifesto on 8chan, the notorious internet forum. If verified, it will be the third such document to accompany a mass shooting since March. Previously, manifestos were published by the alleged Christchurch shooter, who killed 51 people at two mosques in New Zealand in March, and the gunman who opened fire and killed one person at a synagogue in Poway, California, in April. They, too, used 8chan to deliver their epistles of hate. Both times, and now again with El Paso, extremism researchers have pleaded the same case: Don’t amplify the message. It’s …

The Weird, Dark History of 8chan

Brennan, photographed in New City in 2014. But when Brennan’s wife opens the door to his apartment on an afternoon earlier this year, two small dogs pinging excitedly across the tiled floor and around his electric wheelchair, he looks far older. A pair of glasses sit slightly crooked on his face. He jokes about the weight he has gained since moving to the Philippines in 2014, where he lives in part because of the cheaper cost of living compared to the United States. Brennan split fully with the current owner of 8chan last year, but even in this new phase of his life—wife and dogs and all—his role as the gatekeeper of one of the internet’s most controversial sites remains …

How the West Got China’s Social Credit System Wrong

In October 2018, Vice President Mike Pence paid a visit to the Hudson Institute—a conservative Washington, DC, think tank—to give a wide-ranging speech about the United States’ relationship with China. Standing stiffly in a shiny blue tie, he began by accusing the Chinese Communist Party of interfering in US politics and directing Chinese businesses to steal American intellectual property by “any means necessary.” Pence then turned his attention to the country’s human rights abuses, starting not with the persecution of religious minorities, but with a peculiar governmental initiative: the social credit project. “By 2020, China’s rulers aim to implement an Orwellian system premised on controlling virtually every facet of human life—the so-called ‘social credit score,’” Pence said. “In the words …

A Boeing Code Leak Exposes Security Flaws Deep in a 787’s Guts

Late one night last September, security researcher Ruben Santamarta sat in his home office in Madrid and partook in some creative googling, searching for technical documents related to his years-long obsession: the cybersecurity of airplanes. He was surprised to discover a fully unprotected server on Boeing's network, seemingly full of code designed to run on the company's giant 737 and 787 passenger jets, left publicly accessible and open to anyone who found it. So he downloaded everything he could see. Now, nearly a year later, Santamarta claims that leaked code has led him to something unprecedented: security flaws in one of the 787 Dreamliner's components, deep in the plane's multi-tiered network. He suggests that for a hacker, exploiting those bugs …

Robert Mueller’s Work Is Done. Now It’s Congress’s Turn

Robert Mueller proved Wednesday that he might just be the least cooperative friendly witness Congress has ever faced. During close to six hours of Mueller’s testimony before two committees, House Democrats learned the hard way that you can lead a special counsel to an impeachment hearing, but you can’t make him testify. The man who had spent the past two years leading the investigation of Russia’s attack on the 2016 election, and Donald Trump’s apparent obstruction of justice, had promised—warned, really—that he would not go beyond the four corners of the 448-page report he’d delivered earlier this spring. He lived up to that promise. “The report is my testimony,” he told both committees. He refused even to read aloud key …

Cops Are Offering Ring Doorbell Cameras in Exchange for Info

On June 21, Chris Williams, the captain of the El Monte Police Department in California, sent an email to staff reminding them about a new incentive for crime witnesses to share information with law enforcement. Rather than the cash reward used by some programs, El Monte gave out camera-equipped doorbells made by the home security company Ring, which retail starting at $99. “The Ring Home Security Camera system provides not only intelligence about suspect’s action and descriptions, but serves as a deterrent to crime,” Williams wrote, according to documents obtained in response to a public records request. Earlier that year, El Monte had entered into an official partnership with Ring, which gives officers access to an online platform where they …

Security News This Week: China Distributes Spyware at Its Border and Beyond

In the spirit of fireworks and firework-related ER visits, it was an explosive and chaotic week in cybersecurity. The ransomware scourge continues apace, with new local governments and municipalities suffering particularly visible attacks every month. Last weekend the Administrative Office of the Georgia Courts became the latest victim. Meanwhile, facial recognition systems are proliferating in US airports, and though airlines like Delta say that using these services is optional, it can be difficult to avoid them in practice, and trying to do so may arouse suspicion. WIRED also took a deep look this week at mainstream location-tracking services like Google Maps and Apple's Find My Friends. Though they are developed by well-known companies and the location sharing is advertised for …

Hacker Lexicon: What Is Credential Dumping?

Despite all the cybersecurity industry’s talk of preventing “breaches,” a computer network in some ways is less like a fortress and more like a human body. And skillful hackers are like germs: They tend to get in via some orifice or another. Once inside, it’s whether they can thrive and multiply their infections—and what vital organs they can reach—that determines whether the outcome is a sneeze or a full-on catastrophic takeover. In many modern hacking operations, the difference comes down to a technique known as “credential dumping.” The term refers to any means of extracting, or “dumping,” user authentication credentials like usernames and passwords from a victim computer, so that they can be used to reenter that computer at will …

Security News This Week: Myspace Employees Used to Spy on Users

As we approach the July Fourth holiday, the security world had no shortage of fireworks—starting with a hacker group, likely from China, that has spent years breaking into carriers in an effort to hoover up metadata from prime targets. Russia gets most of the attention lately, but never count out China's sophistication and verve. Also never count out Excel as a popular target for hackers. We took a look at two different methods of attack against the venerable spreadsheet software, both of which use the program's features as intended to wreak havoc. We also checked out a bug that a security researcher told Apple about months ago that hasn't been fixed—and hackers have taken notice. And cybersecurity pro Dan Salmon …